This week we’re attempting to sonically take your breath away, with our DRC sound design tutorial for Gui Boratto’s 2009 smash ‘Take My Breath Away’.

Born in São Paulo, Brazil, in 1974, Gui Boratto released his critically acclaimed debut album ‘Chromophobia’ in 2007 on well established german label Kompakt. Featuring tight production skills, driving rhythms and a clear love of melody, it’s easy to attribute such fine technical craftsmanship to Boratto’s many years working as a studio engineer for some of the biggest record labels worldwide.

Fast forward to June of this year, Boratto proudly released his 5th studio album on Kompakt, whilst seeking out talent to put out on his very own D.O.C brand imprint, (conveniently distributed by Kompakt!) which he created in 2013.

As evident in Gui’s final productions, he is inspired by the whole spectrum of life’s emotions and feelings, to create a diverse range of moods. Speaking about the creative process behind his 2018 album Pentagram he explains ‘It’s good to be happy, but also good to be sad, fragile or strong’.

Aside from his own original production work, Gui has also had a steady stream of remix work for a suitably diverse selection of artists, including Pet Shop Boys, London Grammar and even made an appearance on the Halo 4 OST remix album. (Yes that is a real thing and no, we had no idea either!)

Click here to download the Ableton project file

Exhale, exhale, exhale…
Team Imaginando

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